2010 October 6

Runway Reviews: Louis Vuitton, Elie Saab

Louis Vuitton Spring 2011 Louis Vuitton Spring 2011
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(PARIS) LOUIS VUITTON
"The relation between boredom and camp taste cannot be overestimated." That is the Susan Sontag quote that Marc Jacobs used as a reference for his fearless, animalistic, and brilliantly gaudy Spring 2011 effort. His set looked liked something Roberto Cavalli might want to have in his backyard: stuffed tigers and disco curtains. And, as with other seasons, Jacobs got things started exactly on the dot, with his first looks rolling out as about three dozen editors were still taking their seats. (Really, loves, will you never learn?) Those late-comers missed the crucial, Gatsby-worthy fringe dresses that drew applause during the very early stages of the show. His Year of the Tiger parade included a rich selection of flowing dresses, a well done white suit that humorously featured a print on of its pant sides, and plenty of shiny light sweaters. The Vuitton spring experience felt like a joyous Halston-ish safari, with gorgeous skinny heels and an awesome, soft leather bag selection. “Women can always have simplicity,” said Jacobs afterwards. “But I wanted to give them something dazzling, something loud, something for travel, and ultimately something for fun.”

ELIE SAAB
While thinking about spring, Saab had visions of 1970s heydays and their most glamorous icons, like Bianca Jagger and Lauren Hutton. Thus, his Spring 2011 collection offered up plenty of seamless jumpsuits, cheery sequined belts, and a wonderfully constructed jersey dress parade. We appreciated a fresh, almost macaroon-like palette that Saab dreamt up: salmon, rose petal, and early dawn blue. Some of the washed-down print dresses didn't seem as fresh as his other stronger numbers, like impeccably sequined silk satin columns proudly flaunted by an all-star model parade that included Toni, Karolina, and Karlie. This was a very strong outing for the Lebanese master, who still knows how to evoke the desire for his dresses with romanticized women, A-list celebrities, and, most importantly, his loyal consumer base.